Facebook to take on revenge porn

Facebook says it will release new tools to block revenge porn images being distributed on its network.

The tools released today are designed to make it easier for users to report so-called “revenge porn” and to automatically prevent the images from being shared again once they have been banned, the company said.

All it took was a 2015 lawsuit against FB for the company to take ‘revenge porn’ seriously.

From today you should see an option to report a picture as inappropriate specifically because it is a “nude photo of me,” Facebook said in a statement.

The company also said it was launching an automated process to prevent the repeat sharing of banned images.

Photo-matching software will keep the pictures off the core Facebook network as well as off its Instagram and Messenger services, it said.

A specially trained group of Facebook employees will provide a human review of each reported image… hopefully the company will also provide counseling services, cause screw that for a job.

Revenge porn is when sexually orientated images are distributed without consent in an attempt to embarrass one or many of the participants in the image.

It’s been around for years, like when famous people had their sex tapes leaked, or naked photos printed, but no-one gave a shit until normal ‘Joe Bloggs’ images also started being circulated around the webz thanks to ‘relationships gone bad’.

In revenge porn attacks it’s normally women who are targeted by vengeful exes or jealous partners.

Lately victims of these attacks have been suing the people who release them, however, that doesn’t remove the images from the webs or prevent it from being distributed.

As social networks have grown, calls have been made to make platforms more responsible for the content they allow.

In fact, the US government is currently taking Kim Dot Com to trial after successfully gaining the right to extradite him back to the US, for allowing and making money off content he allowed on his streaming and storage sites.

That case will provide a precedent which if successful will allow not only companies but individuals the right to hold platforms or network services accountable for the distribution of content without consent.

In the meantime, platforms such as Facebook will ‘self-regulate’ and provide users tools to prevent not only revenge porn but other disturbing content as well (such as Google’s ‘right to be forgotten’ request).

In the meantime should you come across your sex pic on FB – hit that ban button.

 

 

 

 

 

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Charis McAwesome

Charis McAwesome is the full time writer of hashtagme and was previously a social media manager/advisor to companies including Microsoft, Intel, Lenovo, Deloitte, Tertiary institutions, banks and many more. Charis still provides digital strategy and big data analysis as a consultant.